The big problems

 

FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
Their lives and brains are in complex transition to adulthood.
24/7 judgement from social media.
Pressure from school and home to succeed.
An uncertain higher education, careers and economic future.

 

FOR PARENTS
12-18 year old children whose lives and brains are in complex transition to adulthood.
An education system which is continually changing.
An uncertain higher education, careers and economic future for their children.

 

FOR SCHOOLS
Meet the performance aspirations of parents & regulators whilst also promoting & protecting pupil mental wellbeing.
Ever more school counsellors are needed to reactively manage pupil wellbeing problems.
Reputation & risk management.

The solution

Equip young people with the technology tools to be able to create for themselves their own unique wellbeing and performance ‘thrive zone’.
It’s not who you are that matters, but how you behave.

 

FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
Self-awareness, Understanding, Insight, Clarity.
Knowing when and how to manage their behaviours to realise their potential and resolve their wellbeing problems = better decisions.
Inspiration, Direction, Resilience, Control.

 

FOR PARENTS
Give their children a lifelong advantage.
Equip their children with the technology tools to not just manage the education system but thrive.
Encourage their children to use their phones for a positive purpose.

 

FOR SCHOOLS
Promote both pupil wellbeing and personal performance without lifting a finger.
Improved pupil performance. Reduction in wellbeing issues.
Measurable impact evaluation.
Self-aware pupils benefit far more from face-to-face interaction with wellbeing, choices and career counselling.
Innovation but with Safety, Security, Convenience & Value.

The big problems

 

FOR TEENAGE PUPILS
Their lives and brains are in complex transition to adulthood.
24/7 judgement from social media.
Pressure from school and home to succeed.
An uncertain higher education, careersand economic future.

 

FOR PARENTS
12-18 year old children whose lives and brains are in complex transition to adulthood.
An education system which is continually changing.
An uncertain higher education, careers and economic future for their children.

 

FOR SCHOOLS
Meet the performance aspirations of parents & regulators whilst also promoting & protecting pupil mental wellbeing.
Ever more school counsellors are neededto reactively manage pupil wellbeing problems.
Reputation & risk management.

The solution

Equip teenage pupils with the technology tools to be able to create for themselves their own unique wellbeing and performance ‘thrive zone’. It’s not who you are that matters, but how you behave.

 

FOR TEENAGE PUPILS
Self-awareness, Understanding, Insight, Clarity.
Knowing when and how to manage their behaviours to realise their potential and resolve their wellbeing problems = better decisions.
Inspiration, Direction, Resilience, Control.

 

FOR PARENTS
Give their children a lifelong advantage.
Equip their  children with the technology tools to not just manage the education system but thrive.
Encourage their children to use their phones for a positive purpose.

 

FOR SCHOOLS
Promote both pupil wellbeing and personal performance without lifting a finger.
Improved pupil performance. Reduction in wellbeing issues.
Measurable impact evaluation.
Self-aware pupils benefit far more from face-to-face interaction with wellbeing, choices and career counselling.
Innovation but with Safety, Security, Convenience & Value.

Q takes the young person on a crucial learning journey by following a 3-stage scientific process

Q takes the pupil on a crucial learning journey by following a 3-stage scientific process

An example

How Q could help a young person manage stress

Kate is struggling at home as her parents are arguing a lot. Her homework grades are suffering too as her little brother and sister are so noisy now that she finds it hard to concentrate on her work. She feels she needs to keep them occupied so they don’t wind up her parents anymore. Although she’s got the lead role in her drama club she imagines her parents won’t support her in this as her grades have been poor, so she hasn’t told them.

 

Q shows her what her common stress factors are and how she reacts to these. It makes her realise stress comes from different places.

 

Q supports her by highlighting how she handles set-backs. For Kate when things go wrong she feels like it is her fault, often thinking she is the one that needs to put things right.
Q explains to Kate what her strengths are in handling set-backs – she takes responsibility for mistakes that get made or things that don’t go well.

 

Q also explains to Kate how she can fulfil her potential in handling set-backs – to be aware that others around her will frequently have a part to play in why setbacks happen.

 

Q also explains what Kate’s common ‘thinking errors’ are likely to be, and from understanding these Kate realises these errors can add to her stress. She recognises now her tendency to imagine stories – for example, her belief around her parents’ likely reaction to her drama role if she told them. Q then shows her new stress-busting ways to think, with clear examples of how she could start to think more realistically.

An example

How Q could help a young person manage their revision

Kobe is struggling with his revision. He works fast but can get bogged down in work, not leaving enough time for everything to be completed. He also struggles to perform well when he needs to study on his own.

 

Q provides a framework for Kobe’s revision process that he can follow in line with his natural strengths.

 

Q can support him to identify where he is spending his time and where he can gain more time for quality revision. Kobe is a fast worker, but it is vital he is working on the right activities and putting the effort in.

 

Q can also identify the type of revision approach that will suit Kobe best. It will show him what he will be more comfortable and less comfortable with.

 

Kobe’s particular planning style is a short-term approach. This means he is very involved in delivering short-term objectives but could fail to hit the overall longer-term goal – for example, he can spend too much time on one piece of work that delivers few marks, and fail to leave enough time to complete work that will give a much higher reward. Success at revision for Kobe is about combining his short-term planning strengths with a strategy for the whole revision piece.

An example

How Q could help a young person build their confidence

Sam is 13 and has just joined a new school. He is struggling to make friends and so his confidence has been affected. He is normally a very confident, outgoing sort of person very happy sharing his thoughts and views with others.

 

Q uses bite-sized videos and animations to explain to Sam what confidence is and how it can be affected.

 

Q enables Sam to think about three main things, personalised to him, that could affect his confidence:
  • What he needs to feel to belong in a group and the science why
  • His own internal confidence challengers and the science why
  • How he can sometimes not interact well with another person and the science why
The insight from Sam’s analysis by Q is that he can sometimes not take the time to listen or get to know other people and their views before imposing his own. His forceful style can sometimes be off-putting to others and a little intimidating, therefore making it difficult for Sam to be accepted in a new setting.

 

Q supports Sam to realise how his behaviour could be triggered and how that behaviour can be perceived by others. It also shows him how people’s behaviour can affect him, and provides clear steps to follow to manage this better. By following this path, he will gain more positive reactions from others and his confidence will improve.

An example

How Q could help a young person find the right careers direction

Amelia is 16. She has no idea what she wants to do in the future career-wise, but she feels she needs to explore some options before she picks her A-levels. Her school’s career offering is limited, with little understanding of the real world of work let alone what the future world of work will look like.

 

Q has identified Amelia’s top career themes as People, Leadership, Strategy, Innovative and Organisational. These themes encapsulate the preferred behaviours that are Amelia’s strongest natural strengths and can then be matched to careers in which these behaviours are essential to success.

 

As a result of this analysis, Q then generates a list of potential careers, in order of fit, that will be a good match with Amelia’s behavioural strengths.

 

Q also details what the career entails, how popular it is, how many vacancies there are, the risk of the job being replaced by technology and the level of qualification needed.

 

But Q does not assume that our list should be the only option for Amelia. She can also explore her own ideas about what might suit by investigating, and matching herself, against hundreds of other potential careers.

Valid and reliable

The foundation of Q is its ability to accurately, validly and reliably measure behavioural predispositions. But how can it measure something which is inside a person’s head and, therefore, unobservable?

 

It does this using a psychometric assessment and development methodology developed by Dr Glowinkowski called The Global Predisposition Indicator or ‘GPI’.

 

Psychometric assessments are standard and scientific methods used in many walks of life for measuring unobservable psychological phenomena. An obvious example in education would be ability testing children for verbal and numerical reasoning.

 

Psychometrics are also used extensively for personality assessment by means of an introspective (subjective) self-report questionnaire. And they range from seemingly fun but worthless online quizzes on one end to serious, scientifically validated tools at the other. The serious, scientifically validated tools have been used for decades in business, sport and the military for recruitment and personal and team development, and the GPI is one of those tools.

 

More information about the validity and reliability of the science behind Q can be found at Inside Q.
safety

Safe

Q is wholly positive in tone, sentiment and direction. It emphasises and builds potentials, it does not identify shortcomings. There is no good or bad and no judgement, just insight and clarity. It is about celebrating, emphasising and channelling what is unique about everybody. Q is entirely personal and private to the young person. The young person’s data is entirely their own and 100% protected.  There is no advertising.
secure

Secure

Q was conceived and built by design as a super-secure and super-private personal tool for young people.
Q operates as a web app which is accessed remotely by the young person over the internet from Quintillion’s custom- built proprietary software platform.
All communication uses industry-standard encryption
convenient

Convenient

Q works on the young person’s own device.  No action is required by the parent or school.
More information about the safety, security and convenience of Q can be found at Inside Q.